HomeAdvanced SearchBrowse Movies
Search:   Go SearchHelp
 

Wendy
Short Redhead Reel Reviews date from 1986 to present. This main page lists the five most recent film reviews. To view a complete list of all films reviewed this month, see Previous Reviews on the right.

Wednesday, September 22, 2021
Horizontal Line
 
Cry Macho
  PG-13   2021
  [Opened Sept. 17 in theaters.] When an elderly, cynical, down-on-his-luck horse trainer and rodeo hotshot (Clint Eastwood) agrees to return a favor to his wheeler-dealer ex-boss (Dwight Yoakam) by heading to Mexico to find his estranged, feisty, 13-year-old son (Eduardo Minett) and bring him back to Texas in 1980 in Clint Eastwood’s engaging, moving, low-key, slow-paced, heartfelt, 104-minute neo-western based on N. Richard Nash’s 1975 novel, he discovers the son at a cockfight with his pet rooster with the initial aid of his abusive, alcoholic mother (Fernanda Urrejola) and with the mother’s flunky (Horacio Garcia Rojas) following them they are befriended by a kindhearted widowed Mexican cafe owner (Natalia Traven) who helps them on their journey.

Horizontal Line
 
Man in the Field: The Life and Art of Jim Denevan
  NR   2021
  [Opens Sept. 24 in theaters and various VOD platforms.] Stunning cinematography highlights Patrick Trefz’s compelling, fascinating, mouth-watering, inspirational, 81-minute documentary that showcases the beautiful, transitory, creative, groundbreaking, large-scale artwork of talented artist and chef Jim Denevan who incorporates “table-in-the-field” rather than “farm-to-table” dinners, which has served more than 120,000 guests prepared by more than 700 chefs since 1999 in all fifty states and sixteen countries, including England, Russia, Argentina, and Spain, through his Outstanding in the Field company alongside his fleeting, in-nature, geometric artwork and consists of informative commentary by artists Jane Rosen and Almond Zigmund, chefs (such as David Kinch, Marcus Samuelson, Damian Thomas, John McCarthy, Sean Baker, Matt Lacey, Paul Kulik, Jason Weiner), farmers (such as Bill Denevan, Linda Butler, Dina Brewster, Joan Monteillet, Brandon Pugh, and Anastasia Cole Plakias), author Howie Kahn, publisher Nion McEvoy, museum director William Fox, surfers Adam Repogle and Peter Mel, former Massachusetts governor Deval Patrick, restaurateur Catherine Feris, fishmonger Hans Haveman, sister Tish, childhood friend Andrew McLester, villager Sancho Rodriguez, rancher Doniga Markegard, and vintners Bonny Doon and Randall Graham.

Horizontal Line
 
Marksman,The
  PG-13   2021
  [Available on various VOD platforms.] After a Mexican woman (Teresa Ruiz) on the run from the Mexican cartel is tragically murdered by a ruthless, drug-dealing kingpin (Juan Pablo Raba) in Robert Lorenz’s tense, action-packed, violent, fast-paced, predictable, cliché-driven, 108-minute thriller, a widowed, alcoholic, financially strapped, weathered, sharpshooting, former Marine Vietnam veteran (Liam Neeson), who lives on an Arizona ranch, tries to protect her 11-year-old migrant son (Jacob Perez) from the cartel and bring him to his relatives in Chicago with minor help from his border patrol agent stepdaughter (Katheryn Winnick).

Horizontal Line
 
Eyes of Tammy Faye, The
  PG-13   2021
  [Opens Sept. 17 in theaters.] Stunning acting dominates Michael Showalter’s insightful, factually inspired, compelling, evenly paced, well-written, star-studded (Vincent D’Onofrio, Sam Jaeger, Mark Wystrach, Louis Cancelmi, Gabriel Olds, and Jay Huguley), 126-minute biographical film based on the 2000 documentary and punctuated with acerbic wit that chronicles devout, eccentric, authentic, gaudy, puppet-loving, Diet-Coke-addicted, singing televangelist Tammy Faye Bakker (Jessica Chastain/Chandler Head), who grew up with her piano-playing mother (Cherry Jones), her mom’s husband (Fredric Lehne), and eight siblings in Minnesota, and her ambitious, arrogant, hypocritical, insecure husband Jim Bakker (Andrew Garfield) who had two children (Lila Jane Meadows and Kyle Riggs) together and built the largest Christian broadcasting network, the PTL Club, and religious-based family theme park during the 1960s and 1980s only to lose their religious empire through fraud, financial shenanigans, scandal, sexual improprieties, and conspiracy.

Horizontal Line
 
Civil War (or, Who Do We Think We Are)
  NR   2021
  [Opens Sept. 17 in theaters and available on Peacock.] Rachel Boynton’s powerful, educational, poignant, fascinating, thought-provoking, moving, 100-minute documentary that explores through multilayered discussions what students and people in the South think about slavery, racism, the reasons for the Civil War, and how history is taught in schools and consists of archival film clips and photographs, battle reenactments, and candid commentary by authors Isabel Wilkerson and Dr. Kellie Carter Jackson, historian and author Dr. David Blight, schoolteachers (such as Cate Arnold, Chris Carpenter, and Antwayn Patrick), Sons of Confederate Veterans Robert Epperson and Herbert DeLoach Jr., Mississippi citizens Clyde and Kyle Magee and Deborah and James Robinson, professors Greg Carr and Melissa Janczewski Jones, Mississippi state representative William Shirley and Senator Chris McDaniel, African American Civil War Memorial and Museum Director Frank Smith Jr., assistant professor Stephanie Rolph, artist Kehinde Wiley, school principal LaFrederick Thirkill, Mississippi Department of Archives and History William Rogers, Virginia Congressman John Mercer Langston, Take ‘Em Down NOLA Malcolm Suber, Civil War Roundtable Dale Julius, and Boston University Center for Antiracist Research Director Ibram X. Kendi.


  See the Full List of Reviews from September  
Email Wendy

©2021 by Wendy Schadewald

Redhead Ratings  
Rating Chart